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Under The Senate Health Bill, All Older Adults Would Pay Much More For Individual Health Coverage

Under the Senate Health Bill, All Older Adults Would Pay Much More for Individual Health Coverage

The just-released Senate bill, Better Care Reconciliation Act (BCRA), is very bad news for older adults. The bill reduces financial assistance (premium tax credits and cost-sharing subsidies) and changes rules on how much premiums can vary by age (age-rating). As a result, people ages 50 to 64 would have to pay thousands of dollars more in premiums to buy health insurance in the individual (non-group) market.

Here are four ways the bill would increase the cost of health insurance for older adults ages 50-64:

#1: Older adults would pay five times more than other adults.

The bill would allow insurers to charge people 50 and older up to five times more than younger adults (as opposed to up to three times more under current law) – known as 5:1 age-rating. We estimate that this change alone would increase older adults’ premiums by over $4,000 a year on average across all states.¹

But the bill does even more to make coverage unaffordable.

#2: Many older adults would no longer qualify for premium assistance and would have to pay significantly more.

Starting in 2020, the bill would eliminate premium tax credits for people who earn between 350 percent and 400 percent of the federal poverty level (FPL), which corresponds to incomes between $42,210 and $48,420 in 2017.

When the bill is in effect, a 60-year-old earning $45,000 would have to pay $11,800 more a year in premiums than they would under current law just to keep the same level of coverage he or she has today (Table 1). Their premium under BCRA would be $16,133 a year – over a third of their annual income and more than three and a half times what they would pay under current law. The impact of this change would be even worse in some states, especially in rural areas and parts of the country where health care costs are high (see Table 2 for premium increases in all states). In West Virginia, for instance, that same 60-year-old would end up paying $22,530 a year, which is nearly $18,200 more than what they would pay under current law. In Alaska, a 60-year-old who loses eligibility for this assistance would pay…

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